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Fairtrade, Our Story

We love Fairtrade

Fairtrade is about better prices, decent working conditions, local sustainability and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers in the developing world..

By requiring companies to pay sustainable prices (which must never fall lower than the market price), Fairtrade addresses the injustices of conventional trade, which traditionally discriminates against the poorest, weakest producers. It enables them to improve their position and have more control over their lives.

With Fairtrade you have the power to change the world every day. With simple shopping choices you can get farmers a better deal. And that means they can make their own decisions, control their future and lead the dignified life everyone deserves.

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We Give Back to the Communities That Need It!

Charity

Who we support

We've chosen three charities to support with vital funds to make a difference to communities in coffee growing regions together with ad hoc support for local charities.

Local charities such as Wokingham based charity Young People With Dementia (YPwD) benefit from our support in terms of being able to raise money selling tea & coffee, using our equipment.

Latest News

Recent Blog Posts

  • Our partnership with Toybox: Guatemala City – outreach project & Covid-19 update
    Our partnership with Toybox: Guatemala City – outreach project & Covid-19 update

    Guatemala City itself is a place of contrasts. It has areas of beauty and opportunity but it’s also a highly dangerous place to live – especially for a child living and working on the street without official recognition. This means that street children can be used, neglected and abused by gangs and criminals, and are at significant risk of being trafficked.

    As we are undoubtedly facing a global crisis unlike any the world has ever seen before. In the space of just a few short months, the coronavirus pandemic has spread to almost every country, bringing grief, anxiety and economic chaos. As the outbreak continues, it is easy to miss those who are out of sight. Street children are the hidden victims of this pandemic – which threatens their rights and exposes them to even greater risks. So many of the street children we work with are unable to earn any money, and without a safe place to isolate, they become dependent on government support. But unregistered children are invisible– they do

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  • The Roasting Journey
    The Roasting Journey

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  • Late Winter & Spring Seasonal syrup recipes for tea and coffee
    Late Winter & Spring Seasonal syrup recipes for tea and coffee

    See our Seasonal Recipes here

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  • ToyBox - Guatemala
    ToyBox - Guatemala

    Kingdom Coffee work with Toybox to fund projects in coffee growing regions around the world. Currently we are supporting a project in Guatemala

    CONACMI (the Spanish acronym for National Commission Against Child Abuse) has been working in Guatemala City since 1994. Their work has a specific focus on prevention and assistance to children and adolescents at risk of violence and abuse. Education and vocational training is a major component of their work.

    Santa Faz is an economically deprived area within Guatemala City, categorised as a red-zone by the Guatemalan government, it is one of the most dangerous areas in the country. Most of the population of Santa Faz come from socially excluded and marginalised families, with low levels of formal education, scarce income generating opportunities and a lack of access to basic services. Only 20% of the adult population are employed in the formal economy, the majority are unemployed or gain their livelihoods as street vendors. This

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  • Fairtrade Coffee
    Fairtrade Coffee

    Coffee is such an integral part of everyday life that few of us stop to think what goes into growing the beans that make this hugely popular beverage.

     

    The history and importance of coffee

    Legend has it that the energising effect of the coffee bean was first recognised by a 9th-century goatherd in the Kaffa province of Ethiopia, where the coffee tree originated. Coffee was almost certainly cultivated in Yemen long before the 15th century when Sufi mystics reportedly drank it to keep awake during extended hours of prayer. The drink was spread by Muslim pilgrims and traders across North Africa and the Middle East, where Arabian coffeehouses became centres of political activity. The Dutch planted coffee in Sri Lanka, India and Java in the late 1600s and later in South America. Within a few years Dutch colonies became the main suppliers of coffee to Europe, its production associated with colonial expansion and slavery. Coffee soon became one of the most valuable

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